News & Media

27 August 2015

Doing more to help people after a stroke

For 63-year-old Lachlan Mclean, there was no warning when he suffered a stroke two-and-a-half years ago.

Speech Pathologist Jess Chambers and Lachlan McLean
Speech Pathologist Jess Chambers and Lachlan McLean

For 63-year-old Lachlan Mclean, there was no warning when he suffered a stroke two-and-a-half years ago.

“I got out of bed one night and immediately realised my arm and my leg weren’t working. My wife told me to lie down, and called the ambulance. I never knew what happened,” he says.

After three months doing rehabilitation, Lachlan left Latrobe Regional Hospital.

“Physically I’ve been pretty good, but speech has been slower to recover,” says Lachlan.

“We often see a functional decline in stroke patients if they leave hospital rehabilitation but do not pick up other activities to maintain their health,” says Jess Chambers, speech pathologist at Latrobe Community Health Service.

“We believe we can do more. The clinic we run at Latrobe Community Health Service aims to assist people to live more independently and to avoid functional decline,” she says.

Staff work together with clients to plan a mix of physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech pathology and other services they might need.

“I do speech therapy with Jessica, and my language has become better and better,” says Lachlan.

“That’s part of it. The other part is catching up with other people who have had a stroke. Seeing their progress is good.”

Jess says Lachlan’s got a great sense of humour and great attitude in therapy.

“He’s focused and always wanting to get better. We have good banter, and we can have a laugh when things get difficult.”

Community members can get a referral from their current healthcare professional, or self-refer by calling 1800 242 696.